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MP’s job bill

Canadian reserve soldiers serving overseas shouldn’t have to worry about whether their jobs will be waiting for them when they come home, New Westminster-Coquitlam MP Dawn Black says.

Tuesday, the NDP defence critic introduced a private member’s bill for legislation to protect the jobs of deployed reservists serving with the Canadian Forces.

Though the bills are drawn randomly, Black said she’s hoping her proposal “nudges the government” into action.

“I’m hoping the minister of National Defence will take this forward,” she said. “This is something concrete that supports the troops.”

Black said she brought the bill forward after a visit to Kandahar earlier this year and at the request of constituents.

Currently, legislation to protect reservists’ jobs exists in only three provinces — Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Nova Scotia — but federally regulated workplaces are excluded from the provincial laws. Black said such protection for reservists came into effect in 1998 but it wasn’t implemented.

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