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Talk to kids about dangers of drug use, say Coquitlam police

Police and social workers in the Tri-Cities are encouraging adults to talk to their kids about drugs in light of several recent deaths in B.C. associated to a bad batch of ecstasy. - TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTO
Police and social workers in the Tri-Cities are encouraging adults to talk to their kids about drugs in light of several recent deaths in B.C. associated to a bad batch of ecstasy.
— image credit: TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTO

Police and social workers in the Tri-Cities are encouraging adults to talk to their kids about drugs in light of several recent deaths in B.C. associated to a bad batch of ecstasy.

Newsletters have been sent out to schools across the region outlining the short- and long-term effects the drug can have on young people.

Coquitlam RCMP Cpl. Jamie Chung said that while no deaths have been confirmed in relation to ecstasy in Coquitlam or Port Coquitlam, it is important to let students know some of the dangers involved in taking drugs.

"I think a lot of users often associate safe ecstasy with a good batch of the drug," he said. "However, there is no such thing as a good batch because the synthetic drug is produced in places with no sanitation or quality control."

The newsletter, which was authored jointly by the RCMP's school liaison unit and members of Share Family and Community Services, said adults are important role models for young people thinking about taking drugs. Without the guidance of a grown-up students will often turn to friends, the internet or other sources — which may not be accurate — for information about drugs.

The authors write that parents should look for teachable moments when discussing drug and alcohol use. The more communication that takes place, the more comfortable a young person will be in approaching an adult if they are having issues, the newsletter said.

• For more information go to www.drugprevention.gc.ca or www.sharesociety.ca.

gmckenna@tricitynews.com

 

FACTS ABOUT ECSTASY

• It is always almost a combination drug and may contain methamphetamine, coke, ketamine, DMP or PMA.

• It is often sold in cap form in different shapes, colours and sizes that are stamped with a logo or design.

• The effects can be felt within 20 to 40 minutes after consumption and the high lasts between four and six hours.

• The effects can depend on age, body weight, how much is taken and how often.

• Short-term effects include feelings of pleasure and well-being, increased sociability, feeling full of energy, increased heart rate, blurred vision, jaw clenching and hallucinations.

• Long-term effects and withdrawal symptoms include depression, anxiety, paranoia, panic attacks, change in sleep patterns, nausea, hallucinations, chills and sweating.

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