News

Townhouse development in Port Coquitlam gets a second look

A townhouse proposal that riled neighbours in the Salisbury Avenue area of Port Coquitlam has been brought back to council after the developer made changes to the plan.  - TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTO
A townhouse proposal that riled neighbours in the Salisbury Avenue area of Port Coquitlam has been brought back to council after the developer made changes to the plan.
— image credit: TRI-CITY NEWS FILE PHOTO

A townhouse proposal that riled neighbours in the Salisbury Avenue area of Port Coquitlam has been brought back to council after the developer made changes to the plan.

The new design reduces the number of units in the development from 17 to 15 and increases the number of visitor parking spaces from four to six; the revised proposal also reduces the number of garages with tandem parking from 12 to six.

Council decided to take a second look at the townhouse development after neighbours in the area overwhelmingly opposed the project at a public hearing last month. Many residents complained the development was too big and would dramatically alter the neighbourhood, which is largely made up of single-family homes. There was also concerns that it would lead to more street parking and traffic in the area.

Under Port Coquitlam’s official community plan, townhouse developments are allowed in the neighbourhood, where density is expected to increase in the coming years.

Council voted in favour of the report outlining the changes and the item is expected to go back to public hearing next month.

Other PoCo news:

 

ADAPT & BUILD

Building regulations that would make it easier for seniors and people with changing physical needs to remain in their homes are one step closer to being approved in Port Coquitlam.

During Monday’s meeting, council voted to give third reading to the adaptable housing standards bylaw, which calls for roughed-in framing for features such as handlebars in bathrooms and wider corridors and doorways.

Adaptable units would also have lever-style doors and faucet handles, lower light switches and raised plug outlets to accommodate people in wheelchairs.

If the bylaw gains final approval, it would apply to 30% of housing units in PoCo buildings with 10 or more units.

Mayor Greg Moore voted against the proposal because he said it did not go far enough. He said 100% of units should be convertible and fears that people will not know whether their unit is adaptable.

gmckenna@tricitynews.com

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