News

New film about Riverview Hospital released

Riverview Hospital in its earliest days from an archival photo from the John Davidson collection from the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research. Film at Douglas College tells the story of Riverview psychiatrist Dr. Ralph Arrowsmith. - UBC BOTANICAL GARDEN JOHN DAVIDSON COLLECTION
Riverview Hospital in its earliest days from an archival photo from the John Davidson collection from the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research. Film at Douglas College tells the story of Riverview psychiatrist Dr. Ralph Arrowsmith.
— image credit: UBC BOTANICAL GARDEN JOHN DAVIDSON COLLECTION

The third installment in a gripping film series about Riverview Hospital in Coquitlam will be presented at Douglas College next week.

Premiering at David Lam campus in Coquitlam Thursday, Nov. 15, Consciousness is a 25-minute film produced by Heidi Currie, Criminology instructor at Douglas, and Anna Tremere of the Riverview Hospital Historical Society. It will be shown in room A1470 at 7 p.m. The screening is free, open to the public and will be followed by a Q and A session and refreshments.

Consciousness tells the story of Dr. Ralph Arrowsmith, a mid-20th century psychiatrist with a life-long connection to Coquitlam’s Riverview Hospital, a mental institution that opened in 1913 and closed last summer.

Dr. Arrowsmith, who was passionate about the psychiatric movement and deeply committed to his patients, recounts his years of practice with frank discussions of the treatment and perception of the mentally ill at the iconic mental hospital, from the peak of the institutional movement through deinstitutionalization.

“To hear from somebody who spent his professional life at Riverview and became medical director there is fascinating, because the asylum system no longer exists,” says Currie. "This film gives us insight into the real hospital — that goes beyond stereotypes.”

But Currie also points out that while popular impressions about asylums are overblown, the institutions could in fact be terrifying places.

“People like it to be scary,” she says. “And it is kind of scary. In this film we have this loving, wonderful, even endearing psychiatrist who tells his story, but underneath, as he describes his years at the hospital, are jolting examples of what sometimes made it a terrifying place.”

Dr. Arrowsmith, along with Currie, Tremere and the director of Consciousness, lisa g, will be in attendance.

Featuring archival film and photography combined with re-creation footage, Consciousness is part three of the Riverview Hospital Story Project. Look for part one, Asylum, and part two, Bedlam, on Vimeo.

Douglas College is one of the largest colleges in British Columbia, providing bachelor's degrees, university transfer, career and post-degree programs for over 20,000 students each year.

For more information, visit douglascollege.ca

 

 

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
Baby Joshua is doing well after heart surgery
 
High school football: Panthers, Timberwolves at home on the road
 
Spartans, WolfPack face off in volleyball exhibition at MEI
Host Hawks fourth at midget Tier 1 hockey provincials
 
Abbotsford rugby men taste success vs. UVic
 
Pickup truck collides with train in Abbotsford
Police investigate suspicious death at New Westminster recovery house
 
Hello, Henrik!
 
Sedins bring cash, play ball hockey in Agassiz

Community Events, September 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Sep 17 edition online now. Browse the archives.