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Jamie Bacon faces new charges for alleged plot to kill Person X

Jamie Bacon is shown during his April 2009 arrest in Abbotsford on charges related to the Surrey Six murders.  - Abbotsford News file photo
Jamie Bacon is shown during his April 2009 arrest in Abbotsford on charges related to the Surrey Six murders.
— image credit: Abbotsford News file photo

Accused killer Jamie Bacon, formerly of Abbotsford, faces three new charges in relation to an alleged plan to kill a fellow Red Scorpion gang member.

The charges were announced Monday in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver.

Bacon has been charged with counselling another person to commit an indictable offence, the commission of an offence for a criminal organization, and instructing the commission of an offence for a criminal organization.

He is next scheduled to appear Aug. 22 on those charges.

The charges allege that Bacon was involved in a plot to kill Person X – whose name is protected by a publication ban in the Surrey Six trial – sometime between Nov. 30, 2008 and Jan. 2, 2009.

The plot allegedly took place around Abbotsford, Port Moody, Port Coquitlam and Coquitlam.

Person X survived a targeted shooting in December 2008 and is currently serving a life sentence after pleading guilty to killing three of the people in the Surrey Six slayings on Oct. 19, 2007.

He was supposed to testify at the trial, which wrapped up Monday, of alleged killers Matthew Johnston and Cody Haevischer, but his evidence was ruled as inadmissible by the judge.

Bacon is currently in prison awaiting a separate trial in the Surrey Six case on a charge of conspiracy to commit murder and one charge of first-degree murder.

It was alleged at the trial for Haevischer and Johnston that Bacon, head of the Red Scorpions gang, ordered the hit on rival drug dealer Corey Lal because he failed to pay a $100,000 "tax," and the five others were killed because they were witnesses.

Bacon was living in Abbotsford during the period of the alleged murder plot against Person X.

At the time, the Bacon brothers – also including Jonathan and Jarrod – were also the subjects of a murder plot, resulting in a public warning from the B.C. Integrated Gang Task Force.

The task force warned that anyone associating with the brothers could be in jeopardy as the trio were targets of a murder plot by rival gangsters.

The Bacon family home, which they no longer own, and the street on which it was located – Strathcona Court in east Abbotsford– were placed under video surveillance.

Jamie Bacon was the subject of a an attempted hit on Jan. 20, 2009 at about 4 p.m. when he was shot at while driving his car in the intersection of South Fraser Way and Sumas Way.

Seven men later admitted to conspiring to kill the brothers and received sentences ranging from seven to 14 years.

Jonathan was killed in a targeted shooting in Kelowna in August 2011. Jarrod is currently serving a 14-year sentence on a charge of conspiring to traffic cocaine.

Meanwhile, the judge's verdict in the trial of Johnston and Haevischer is scheduled to be issued Oct. 2 in Vancouver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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