Opinion

EDITORIAL: Dirty, deadly work

Once again, B.C. Conservation Officers are being criticized for doing the dirty work created by garbage scofflaws who refuse to clean up their act.

No one likes the idea of bears being shot for being bears, least of all the officers, but when bears start eating garbage and getting habituated to humans, they turn into problem bears and options are limited.

The fact is, bears are supposed to hibernate in winter but they’ll stay awake if there is food around so the people to blame for three recent Port Coquitlam bear deaths are careless people, not the conservation officers who dispatched them.

Dropping bears off deep in the forest is the option preferred by most but, let’s face it, in winter, when there’s nothing to eat, those bears would have starved to death. We might feel better but the bear’s fate would have been the same.

The problem is garbage and those Port Coquitlam bears killed last week would be still be alive today, snoozing away the winter, if it weren’t so easy to get.

 

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

Clark on climate, clawbacks, credit cards
 
Check out the variety of Christmas light displays in the Tri-Cities
 
EDITORIAL: Yes with reservations on proposed Metro transit tax
COLUMN: Clean coal? Wait, isn’t that an oxymoron?
 
Lack of addiction treatment flagged by crime panel
 
Buena Vista Avenue closed after elderly pedestrian struck
You’re never too old to go back
 
Steveston Lifeboat pulled from the Fraser River
 
Silver Valley residents fed up with mail theft

Community Events, December 2014

Add an Event


Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Dec 17 edition online now. Browse the archives.